Pom Pom Activities for Toddlers

Pom poms are very versatile little toys! They’re easy to find and come in tons of colors. I’ve compiled a list of pom pom activities for toddlers you can do at home and what skills you address with them. This is a post about activities for toddlers but stay tuned for the older kiddos!

pom pom activities for toddlers. Ways to keep their little hands busy! Toddlers can be movers and shakers, but often times fine motor skills will slow them down and tire them out. A lot of people don't know this! Check out this post on 10 different pom pom activities for toddlers.

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Pom poms – you may have heard of them but you might not know what they are. They are small cotton balls of different colors and sizes. You can use them for arts and crafts, learning activities, reward systems, etc. This post is going to give you some ideas for those learning activities.

My kids love playing with pom poms. I have a small basket of them in our living room just sitting on the bookcase and they will just grab them whenever the mood strikes. It keeps them busy and quiet so I’m okay with it. It also takes a tiny bit of extra time to clean up which is also awesome because it keeps them busy a little bit longer.

Pom Pom Activities For Toddlers

  • Pom Pom drop: This requires holding onto some paper towel and toilet paper rolls. Tape them to the wall with painters tape and have your baby drop them down the tubes. Have an older kid who wants to play? Color the tubes and have them match colors, give them a dice and have them drop the number of pom poms that comes up in their roll.
    • Fine motor
    • Hand eye coordination
    • Cooperative play
  • Pom Pom painting: Attach pom poms to clothespins and let them dip into paint and then onto paper.
    • Fine motor
    • Sensory
    • Learning colors
  • Pom Pom sorting: Using bowls, muffin tins, etc, designate a color to each section and have your toddler drop the pom poms into the appropriate sections. As a bonus challenge, give them a tool to use like tongs, tweezers, etc. You can find a great list of tools here.
    • Fine motor
    • Colors
    • Math (sorting)
  • Pom Pom maze: Create a maze with painters tape on the floor. Give your toddler a straw and have them blow a pom pom through the maze.
    • Oral motor (helps with speech and feeding)
    • Math/relationships/problem solving
    • Cooperative play
  • Pom Pom push: Take an empty plastic wipes container and give your toddler the pom poms. Have them push the pom poms into the container through the hole. You could also take an old tupperware or plastic food container and cut holes out of the top and have them press them in as well.
    • Fine motor
    • Colors (talk about each color)
    • Numbers (count as you push them in.)
  • Magnetic pom poms: Attach small magnets on the back of some pom poms and stick them to the fridge! Let your toddler explore them on their own. This is a great activity if you have an especially clingy toddler and need to get some cooking done.
    • Fine motor
    • Colors
    • Numbers
    • Independent play
  • Frozen pom poms: This activity requires some setting up. Drop pom poms into an ice cube tray and fill with water. Freeze until solid and let your toddler explore the properties of ice and water.
    • Fine motor
    • Science (ice/water)
    • Colors/numbers
  • Mega Blocks and pom poms: Do you have Mega Blocks at home? Flip them over! They make great little sorters!
    • Fine motor
    • Colors
    • Math/relationships (sorting)
  • Pom Pom sensory bin: Use the pom poms as sensory bin fillers.  Add in anything you’d like to work on with your kids – colors, numbers, shapes, etc.
    • Sensory play
    • Colors/numbers/shapes
    • Independent play
  • Sticky pom pom play: Tape a large piece of contact paper (sticky side out) to a window or glass door. Have your toddler experience the sticky feeling and the ability to add them to it.
    • Fine motor
    • Science (trial and error)
    • Independent play

As always, if you do one or all of these activities, tag me on Instagram (@mostlyundercontrol) so I can see it in action!

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